Preparing for Your New Kitten

Taken away from her mother, brothers and sisters, your kitten will feel very lonely once you bring her home. To try and relieve this complete change of scenery, it is essential that you are ready to welcome your kitten into her new family. It’s a good idea to have all the necessary items before the

Taken away from her mother, brothers and sisters, your kitten will feel very lonely once you bring her home. To try and relieve this complete change of scenery, it is essential that you are ready to welcome your kitten into her new family.


It’s a good idea to have all the necessary items before the kitten is brought home. Your list should include food, feeding bowls, a litter box, a bed and toys.

Introducing the new environment, new family members and possible fellow pets (dogs and/or cats already living in your household) is a very important stage in successfully integrating your kitten into her new home. A poor introduction could cause a feeling of frustration and/or jealousy for your existing pet(s).

You are now responsible for your kitten’s safety. You have taken the place of the mother and now the kitten will rely on you for confidence and protection. Take good care of your kitten, as you are now responsible for proper growth and health.

Children

Children often tend to almost smother the new arrival with attention. An adult cat is perfectly capable of avoiding children when she doesn’t want to be bothered, but a kitten is not. You should explain to your children that the kitten is not a toy, that she needs lots of sleep and that it is absolutely forbidden to wake the kitten just to cuddle or play. It is best not to allow young children to play with the kitten when you are not present. Your supervision will ensure the child is gentle with the kitten and aid in avoiding scratches.

Handling Your Kitten

Remember to handle your kitten carefully. Rough or sudden movement can terrify your pet.

If you want to carry your kitten, the best way is to slide one hand, open wide, under the stomach with the other under the rear end for bigger breeds. Do not slide both hands under the front feet.


Carrying your kitten

If you want to carry your kitten, the best way is to slide one hand, open wide, under the stomach with the other under the rear end for bigger breeds. Do not slide both hands under the front feet.


With other pets at home

Introducing the new environment, new family members and possible fellow pets (dogs and/or cats already living in your household) is a very important stage in successfully integrating your kitten into her new home. A poor introduction could cause a feeling of frustration and/or jealousy for your existing pet(s). This must take place gradually and gently. You can take certain precautions and make subtle changes to protect your new kitten from “accidents waiting to happen” inside your home.

Dogs

A well-socialized dog will easily accept the young kitten. Older dogs may be less tolerant, but a small scratch from your kitten will soon
make the dog less aggressive and integration will generally take place quickly and without major problems.

Isolate the kitten, so that she gradually learns the way about the house and doesn’t hide under furniture. Maintain your existing pet’s (dog and/or cat) privileges for the first few days, but make introductions soon after your kitten arrives home so that she can be properly integrated into the household.

Other Cats

An adult cat does not really appreciate invasion of her territory. She will show displeasure with threatening behaviour. Total acceptance may take several months.

During the introduction, do not allow any aggression. Try introducing the cats on neutral territory during play or meal times. Repeat the process until the cats no longer mind each other’s presence and begin to share. A hierarchical relationship will then be established between the cats, a relationship that you must respect.


Source : Le Livre du Chaton, Royal Canin Canada Company 2004

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